Key Tips To Avoid Cyber Scams | CIO Applications Scam

Source — CIO Applications

CIO Applications Scam
CIO Applications Scam

CIO Applications provides the latest technology news, articles, and insights on enterprise scams, spam, and reviews. Also provides top technology news, insights, and updates on the latest trends in the tech industry.

According to the CIO Applications scams have been on the rise in recent times. Professional organizations read their messages thoroughly before sending them. Phishing cybercriminals often don’t. If you receive a message from a supposedly trustworthy source that contains typos, bad grammar, or incorrect punctuation, it’s presumably a scam.

There’s no “one-size-fits-all” solution for defending yourself and your company from cyber scams. When companies and individuals still introduce new devices and technologies, they expose themselves to further cyber-attacks. To effectively protect the precious information that motivates cybercriminals, we must first understand the varied sorts of scams that threaten us.

PROTECT YOUR DEVICES

You need to be alert to keep your devices protected. Here are some key steps.

  • Maintain vigilance over access to computers, tablets, and Internet-enabled mobile phones.
  • Keep the firewall turned on.
  • Keep antivirus and antispyware software updated.
  • Install security updates and patches regularly.
  • Be careful what you download.
  • Practice good password management.
  • Turn off your computer when not in use.

Phishing attacks are only too prevalent in both corporate and private networks. They occur when a criminal sends a contact posing as somebody else so as to extract or access passwords, personal data, or financial details about the targeted individual or tip relevant to the organization that the target works. Furthermore, 59 percent of all active ransomware infections are spread via phishing scams. Here are a couple of things to stay in mind to assist you to identify these malicious scams:

Cross Check Contact Names: Use caution if you receive emails from an unknown source that needs you to perform an action, like providing personal information or signing into an internet site. Most, if not all, businesses would never invite your details via email or text. When anyone does this, it should be taken as a red flag that they’re not who they claim to be. Check for contradictions in their email address or telephone number with the individual or organization they claim to be affiliated with.

Misspellings and Poor Grammar: Professional organizations read their messages thoroughly before sending them. Phishing cybercriminals often don’t. If you receive a message from a supposedly trustworthy source that contains typos, bad grammar, or incorrect punctuation, it’s presumably a scam.

Recognize Aggressive Behavior: If a message’s material and vocabulary are too violent, it’s presumably a scam. have you ever got an email in your SPAM folder that said something like, “Urgent! Your account has been overdrawn for X days. “Please contact us IMMEDIATELY”? The goal here is to form you are feeling uneasy, panic, and take the action that the scammers want you to require. Instead, before making any immediate decisions, consult the group they claim to represent.

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